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 Tips for Catching Rainbow's and Splake... 
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I am going to go camping and will be near an inland lake that has both Rainbow Trout and Splake. This is a smaller inland lake. I will have my 16 foot with the 50hp, bow trolling motor and a 5HP Kicker.

Anyone have an tips for Rainbow's and Splake on an inland lake? I'm thinking about trolling dipsy divers and spoons but are there other ways both trolling and non-trolling?

THANKS!

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Mon May 19, 2008 4:59 pm
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Location: St. Clair County, Michigan
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Ok I am of course seaching for info online and I will post what I find but please if any of you fish inland lakes for Rainbows and Splake please share your tips!

Quote:
The DNR stocked this lake repeatedly from 1995 to 2001.

In 2001 alone, 6,300 splake running about 7½ inches apiece were stocked here. Why?

Well, to provide good fishing for us humans — and loons — and because splake are sterile and do not reproduce.

They're a hybrid between a speckled or brook trout and a lake trout. Needless to say, they're abundant and run up to a length of 14 inches.

You can ice fish for them close to shore. As the water warms, they come in shallow to feed.

There's a short time, depending on the thickness of the ice, when ice fishing is fantastic, from about March 15 into the first week of April.

Then you can still have a great time fishing for them near shore in open water, perhaps the finest trout fishing you can imagine.

As you would on many other lakes, fish them early in the spring and late in the fall. Let me tell you how I learned this.

One fine summer day when I was supposed to be selling electrical supplies — you know, driving around aimlessly and daydreaming, the heat getting to me — I stopped for lunch at the campsite.

Just happened to have a pole in the trunk, with some corn and some 'crawlers in the cooler with my lunch.

I put a piece of corn and a bit of 'crawler on a small Swedish Pimple and started casting.

I tried everything to no avail. That's what I deserved for playing hooky, I guess. No splake on my hooky.

However, after making a sales call to a contractor, I returned in the evening and did well.

As the water cooled I waded out near the only island and threw a small plain hook with corn and 'crawler attached.

Oh, I added two small sinkers to 6-pound mono and used my spinning reel and a flexible rod. A fly rod guy I am not.

Small spinnerbaits and jigs tipped with artificial grubs also perform well.

Needless to say, I had a ball and kept three splake for dinner. Splake are feisty fighters and fine fare for the table.

What: Splake and rainbow trout

When: Early spring is a great time to fish for splake.

Fish early or late in the day.

Evenings are best.

What I learned from all this

Fishing for splake is an early spring thing and a late fall thing.

Also, fish for them early or late in the day, preferably in the evening.

Since those early days I did learn a few more things. You can't catch those "little devils" during those hot summer days, the days when many of us are on vacation.

You'll have to move out deeper as the weather warms and the the water warms right along with it.

Yep, trout are cold-water fish.

Therefore, bring along a boat on those warmer days and you just might catch those little devils in one of the deep holes.

Try trolling 'crawler harnesses or cowbells down deep, using downriggers during the summer.

Or on those really hot days, jigging right over the side of the boat is a productive method.

A small jigging Rapala or any of the small jigging spoons will produce splake. It's my opinion that when you find them, you'll catch them.

Trolling or jigging in 40 feet of water or more will usually do the trick.

Try the area around the 86-foot hole or the sandbar off the east end in 20 to 30 feet of water.

And again, cast to the island or use a slip bobber, especially if you want the kids to catch a few.

Splake fishing is a great way to teach kids how to fish.

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Mon May 19, 2008 5:19 pm
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Location: St. Clair County, Michigan
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Some more tips...

Rainbow trout
Rainbow trout are commonly stocked in designated stream trout lakes. They average 10 to 14 inches, but larger fish are possible in lightly fished waters.

Spring
Rainbow trout may frequent the shallows in the spring. Inflate a nightcrawler with air and cast it out from shore, using a slip sinker for weight. Or troll with cowbells trailed by a nightcrawler.

Summer
Rainbow trout are most active in June and July, when they feed on insects. Fly-fish with dry flies or nymphs. Cast or troll with small crankbaits, spinners, or spoons. The best fishing is in the evening.

September and October
Few anglers pursue rainbows in the fall, but good fishing is possible. Bottom-fish with an inflated nightcrawler. Cast or troll with small lures or flies along shorelines.

Brook trout and splake
Fine-tasting brook trout and splake (a hybrid of lake trout and brook trout) are stocked in small, northern lakes. Fish measuring 12 to 16 inches are possible. Larger fish exist in some remote lakes.

Spring
Look for brook trout and splake near points and shoreline shallows. Troll near shore with spinners tipped with worms. Cast or troll with dark-colored nymphs or Wooly Buggers.

Summer
Brook trout fishing is excellent in June and early July, but splake seem to disappear after Memorial Day. Use wet flies and dry flies to catch summer brookies. You'll often find them near submerged boulders.

September and October
Brook trout and splake are fall spawners, but they cannot successfully spawn in most lakes because they need streams for spawning. Troll or cast for them as they congregate near points.

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Mon May 19, 2008 6:34 pm
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Location: St. Clair County, Michigan
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Something else I found...

Quote:
One "trick" is to use fresh nightcrawlers and to inject a small bubble of air into the tail section kind of like some of the Walleye Gurus do on some of their spinner rigs. The only difference is, I slide a 1/8 to 3/8 oz. egg (slip) sinker on my line first, depending on how far I want to cast and on how deep I'm fishing... tie on a #6 baitholder hook....maybe a #8 if the crawlers you have are on the small side.....then pinch a small splitshot about 8" to 24" or so up the line. Hook the crawler once through the head/collar and then inject a bubble of air into the tail section of the crawler so that it floats up off the bottom. You can check your rig by just dropping it in the water a little ways out in front of you so you can see if it "rides" up off the bottom where you want it to be. Watch your line closely and as soon as you see a take....pick the rod up and get ready... I usually open the bail and let them go a bit and then set the hook after they stop and start to move again because they can't always engulf the crawler and will grab the floating tail section and go a ways before stopping to gobble the crawler into their mouth prior to swallowing it. If you want you can also open your bail and tuck the line under a rubber band (that you have already slid up onto your reel handle). Works well for other species also...WK

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Mon May 19, 2008 8:14 pm
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Location: fowlerville, mi
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i dont know much about fishing for them in lakes. we fish one down here by me and use wax worms on a really small hook under a clear bobber.

another lake upnorth we fish, we use wax worms, but wait till after dark. later in the summer find the thermocline, they should be there.

also, remember trout circle the lake/pond, whatever looking for food. you might get into them really good for 15 minutes or so and then not get another bite for an hour or more.


Tue May 20, 2008 3:19 pm
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Thanks Sean! I found some good info and hopefully we have some cool pics of some nice Splake and Rainbows come Tuesday!

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Tue May 20, 2008 3:48 pm
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Good luck Don. Call me when you get the chance if you want more info...

Mike

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Tue May 20, 2008 4:56 pm
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Don, I've had really good success with using a perch type rig with single eggs, weighted with a bell sinker on the bottom. The bows really like singles, I usually put 2 or 3 eggs on 1 hook. Or you can jig for them, works with splake as well. Again, I like pimples, smaller bucktail jigs, small cleo's, if their picky that day, you can tip them with a minnow or twister grub.


Tue May 20, 2008 7:51 pm
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Location: St. Clair County, Michigan
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Hunting Area: Gwinn, Michigan, St. Clair County, MI
Thanks everyone for the tips and keep them coming if anyone has some more tips...

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Tue May 20, 2008 8:05 pm
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What Rivers do you fish?: nw mostly. the mo, white, pm once in a while the grand
What Bodies of Water do you fish?: most lakes in livingston county
Hunting Area: livingston county
spentwing is definately the master when it comes to catching trout out of lakes!! i have been with him a couple of times and he knows how to get it done.


Tue May 20, 2008 8:17 pm
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SpentWing wrote:
Good luck Don. Call me when you get the chance if you want more info...

Mike


Mike - old thread, but I would love to hear some of your tactics. In my limited experience, I have seen Splake and Rainbows eat crankbaits, crawlers, and the locals in Canada troll with the "cowbell" rigs, I can't believe they work based on what they look like.

On the ice, we have done well for both species on minnows.

JL


Thu Dec 29, 2011 9:55 am
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Cowbells do work, but I don't use them much. Early in the season I use Panther Martins and splitshot. Usually troll from 25 - 40 fow. Later in the summer when the thermocline sets up I like to use mini dypsy divers and small spoons.

Night fishing - again usually 25 - 45 fow. Wax worms and wigglers are my go to baits. Fish them 10 - 20' down. When the thermocline sets up, put the baits just above it. I hang a lantern over the side of the boat to see the rod tips. If you're catching bluegills or crappies, go deeper.

Mike

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Thu Dec 29, 2011 9:20 pm
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sounds like good advice to me. :o thanks!


Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:27 pm
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